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Seventh Annual Penn State Addiction Symposium is Dec. 6

The virtual event will highlight substance use research, treatment, education and community engagement from all Penn State campuses and Penn State Addiction Center for Translation community partners on Monday, Dec. 6, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Clinicians, researchers, students and community entities are invited to submit abstracts until Nov. 11.

Register here

Call for abstracts

We invite abstract submissions for three different types of presentations, all due on Thursday, Nov. 11:

For faculty

  • 10-minute faculty presentations
  • Presented the day of symposium on Dec. 6
  • A total of 6 will be accepted

For students and trainees

  • 5-minute student and trainee data-blitz talks
  • Presented the day of symposium on Dec. 6

For partners and collaborative groups

  • Prerecorded 5-minute presentation
  • Uploaded to symposium website
  • If submitting an abstract for a prerecorded presentation, please also include an overview of the program or initiative and an explanation of how the program and initiative addresses substance use disorder, and if applicable, if the impact or efficacy of the program has been measured

Abstract guidelines

Abstracts should be approximately 300 words and include:

  • Abstract title
  • The full name, position/job title, affiliation and email address of the author and all co-authors
  • Three keywords that relate to the topic and/or target audience
  • An explicit statement regarding which of the above categories you are submitting your abstract
  • Title, author information and keywords are not included in the 300-word count

Review process and notification

The call for abstracts will close on Thursday, Nov. 11.

Please submit your abstract to psact@pennstatehealth.psu.edu.

Each submission will be reviewed and notifications of acceptance will be sent by Nov. 18, at which time, you will receive further instructions regarding presentation and preparing recordings.

For questions about abstracts please contact Sarah Ballard at sballard@pennstatehealth.psu.edu.

Agenda

Featured speakers

  • Professional photo of Dr. Judith Feinberg

    Judith Feinberg, MD
    Vice Chair, Research and Professor, Infectious Diseases
    West Virginia University

    In 2005, Dr. Judith Feinberg was the first physician in metropolitan Cincinnati to recognize that opioid injection drug use had emerged as a health threat due to increased endocarditis admissions. She became involved in harm reduction efforts and, in 2014, after a nine-year effort, she established Ohio’s third syringe exchange and its first true syringe services program, the Cincinnati Exchange Project.

    West Virginia has the highest rates of acute hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, and overdose deaths in the U.S. After a long career in HIV/AIDS, Feinberg came to WVU in late 2015 to focus on ending these opioid-related epidemics at their epicenter. As Professor of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry and Professor of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, she is working hard to turn the tide on the opioid-related epidemics.

    Feinberg has federal funding from state and federal agencies and was recently named the first E.B. Flink Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine.

  • A headshot of Jane Liebschutz, MD, MPH, FACP

    Jane Liebschutz, MD, MPH, FACP
    Chief, Division of General Internal Medicine
    University of Pittsburgh

    Dr. Jane Liebschutz’s research is focused on developing interventions to combat the current crisis in opioid use disorders. More broadly, her research focuses on substance use, violence and mental health within the practice of general medical care.

    Liebschutz has conducted numerous observation and intervention studies, including research on opioid prescribing for chronic pain in primary care. She has also directed randomized trials to study the treatment of opioid and injection drug use disorders in hospitalized patients. Liebschutz has a sustained history of funding from local, state and federal sources.

    Liebschutz is a primary care doctor who also practices addiction medicine, having cared for hundreds of patients with substance use disorder. Her clinical practice has focused on underserved populations, especially those who have experienced the triad of trauma, pain and substance use.

Professional photo of Dr. Judith Feinberg

Judith Feinberg, MD
Vice Chair, Research and Professor, Infectious Diseases
West Virginia University

In 2005, Dr. Judith Feinberg was the first physician in metropolitan Cincinnati to recognize that opioid injection drug use had emerged as a health threat due to increased endocarditis admissions. She became involved in harm reduction efforts and, in 2014, after a nine-year effort, she established Ohio’s third syringe exchange and its first true syringe services program, the Cincinnati Exchange Project.

West Virginia has the highest rates of acute hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, and overdose deaths in the U.S. After a long career in HIV/AIDS, Feinberg came to WVU in late 2015 to focus on ending these opioid-related epidemics at their epicenter. As Professor of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry and Professor of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, she is working hard to turn the tide on the opioid-related epidemics.

Feinberg has federal funding from state and federal agencies and was recently named the first E.B. Flink Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine.

A headshot of Jane Liebschutz, MD, MPH, FACP

Jane Liebschutz, MD, MPH, FACP
Chief, Division of General Internal Medicine
University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Jane Liebschutz’s research is focused on developing interventions to combat the current crisis in opioid use disorders. More broadly, her research focuses on substance use, violence and mental health within the practice of general medical care.

Liebschutz has conducted numerous observation and intervention studies, including research on opioid prescribing for chronic pain in primary care. She has also directed randomized trials to study the treatment of opioid and injection drug use disorders in hospitalized patients. Liebschutz has a sustained history of funding from local, state and federal sources.

Liebschutz is a primary care doctor who also practices addiction medicine, having cared for hundreds of patients with substance use disorder. Her clinical practice has focused on underserved populations, especially those who have experienced the triad of trauma, pain and substance use.

Contact

The background image is Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center's campus in Hershey, PA, is seen from the air.

Please email PSACT@pennstatehealth.psu.edu for details or with questions.